CanvasLIVE: Flickr Pinterest Diigo Padlet

Here’s my slidedeck, and I’ll add the video after the Thursday, June 29 event at 3PM Eastern time. You’ll find active links on the slides, along with links and notes below. 🙂

Slide 1. Cover slide.
Slide 2. Title slide.
Slide 3. Connected Learning… with Cats.

Slide 4. Taming the Web: The Power of Curation. This is my third curation presentation so far this summer; you can find the other two here: YouTube Playlists and Online Book Libraries.

Slide 5. Dimensions of Curation. My focus for today is just on the sharing dimension of curation; I’ll be showing how you can share the “same” content in very different ways with very different tools, all of which work nicely in Canvas.

Slide 6. Different Tools, Different Purposes. I’ve created a site where you can see the four tools — Pinterest, Flickr, Diigo, and Padlet — side by side: StoryLab.LauraGibbs.net.

Slide 7. Quick Overview of the Four Tools. I’m going to run through the four tools very quickly, and I hope you will go to the StoryLab site to see each one in action. For each tool, you are looking at a new summer project for my Indian Epics class where I am building a collection of “Stories from India” to use in conjunction with the epics. This is a brand-new project for the summer that I just started a couple of weeks ago.
Slide 8. Flickr. This page has a Flickr album slideshow with the stories from India.
Slide 9. Pinterest. This page has a Pinterest Board with the stories from India.
Slide 10. Diigo (RSS). This page has a live Diigo feed (via Inoreader) with the stories from India.
Slide 11. Padlet. This page has a Padlet with the stories from India.

Slide 12. Embedding the Tools in Canvas. In terms of being quick and easy, Padlet is the fastest (just use the Redirect Tool), and next would be Diigo (subscribe in Inoreader and then use Redirect Tool), with Flickr and Pinterest being more complicated because you have to upload the javascript as a File in Canvas, and then use an iframe to display that File in a Page. It’s not hard to do that, but it’s a multistep process that will probably take about 10 minutes.
Slide 13. Flickr: Javascript-in-File-to-Page. Configuring the album slideshow is very easy!
Slide 14. Pinterest: Javascript-in-File-to-Page. There are lots of widget configuration options.
Slide 15. Diigo to Inoreader, then Redirect Tool. This assumes you are already using Diigo; if you are not using Diigo already, this is a good reason to start!
Slide 16. Padlet: Redirect Tool. Because the Padlet site design is really clean, it looks great in Canvas.

Slide 17. Special Advantages of Each Tool. The main message I’d like people to take away from this presentation is that each of these tools is excellent, and the key is to define your goals so that you can choose the best one, or maybe even an entirely different tool. There are so many great web-based tools these days!

Slide 18. Flickr: Album Editing Options. Flickr is a serious image management tool, and you have so many options for rearranging the contents of an album. That is not true for the three other tools.
Slide 19. Flickr: Works Well in Small Size. Another distinctive thing about a Flickr slideshow is that it looks great in a small size, so that you can even fit it nicely into a Discussion Board prompt.

Slide 20. Pinterest: Students Love It! I really like to use tools that my students are going to like using, and that is a big plus for Pinterest. Many of my students are already serious Pinterest users, but they don’t think of it as a tool for school. They are excited to find out about new features of Pinterest that make it a great tool for schoolwork. Here are my Pinterest Tech Tips.
Slide 21. Pinterest: Pin Pages for Discovery. Given the billions of images at Pinterest, it can provide excellent discovery based on related images, often leading you to Boards with valuable resources by serious collectors, including museums who use Pinterest.

Slide 22. Diigo: Managing Massive Amounts of Stuff. If you are curating massive amounts of stuff (as I usually am), Diigo is the most practical choice. Flickr is pretty good too (it offers some good searching and tagging options), but Diigo still wins for scalability.
Slide 23. Diigo-Inoreader: Totally Automatic Updates. Admittedly, it takes just a few seconds to add an image to Flickr or to pin something at Pinterest or to post something on a Padlet, but depending on how you set up your workflow, the Diigo-Inoreader process can be 100% automatic so that content is feeding into your Canvas Pages automatically as you create your content.

Slide 24. Padlet: Totally Fun Collaboration. You can create Padlets with different settings for content creation and content commenting, making it possible for your students to post at a Padlet in Canvas, seeing others’ contributions in real time. It’s so much more fun than a Discussion Board. Try it out at this Padlet Playground (which is set up with “secret” as the privacy setting, so that only people with the link can post).
Slide 25. Padlet: Truly Easy Tool. As I mentioned above, Padlet wins hands-down for ease of use: it is easy to create a Padlet (they have a great step-by-step process to help you configure your settings), and then it is easy to put into Canvas with the Redirect Tool (see above).

Slide 26. Presentation Recap.
Slide 27. Let’s Connect.
Slide 28. Closing slide.

And here are some Flickr cats of course:

Martin Luther King Canvas Widget

I did not post anything in this blog so far this week: there was Martin Luther King Day on Monday, and then school started on Tuesday — and the first day of school is always wild. But it’s now Wednesday; I’ve got 84 blogs up and running and all happily networked (just waiting on 2 more), so I wanted to catch up here a little bit.

First, I want to share the Martin Luther King Day widget which I made, using some King quote posters that I had created a few years ago in honor of the holidays. Like with my other widgets, you will find it in the Canvas Widget Warehouse. There’s an iframe version you can use inside Canvas, plus javascripts you can use in a blog, like there (just reload for more):



Even though I only use that widget one day a year, I am really glad for it: on that day, I replace the daily class announcement blog post (which students see as the Canvas homepage) with a post that features the widget, and I also include the 200-pixel version of the widget in the blog’s sidebar. That means students who are doing work for the class (and that means quite a few of them) get to see multiple quotes throughout the day, hopefully learning something new about Dr. King and his legacy.

For more information, see the Martin Luther King widget page.

Crossposted at OU Canvas Community.